North America Dharma Teacher Workshop interview 2
【人間社記者 Karen Sun New York報導】 2017-08-18
  • 圖說:Simon(person in middle) thinks the key to localization is the leader. “People make the difference.” A good leader must have a 360-degree view to learn the different needs, and be able to plan the proper talent training. 圖/IBPS, New York提供

Simon Kuo is a second generation Chinese. Her father passed away while she was a teenager. After following her mother to Hsi Lai Temple, the peace and tranquility exuded from the Venerable while calming her mother left a lasting impression on her. From there, the questions started. What is Buddhism? Can I have the same peace and tranquility of the Venerable? Her journey of Buddhism learning commenced.

To her, going to Hsi Lai Temple is like going home. She thought she could learn Buddhism quickly, but after months of exploring, she realized Dharma is not the same as studying Buddhism. She was quite lost about it. On her birthday, she prayed in the main shrine and wish Buddha could give her confidence. After stepping out of the main shrine, a volunteer asked for her help. She started volunteering, met Master Hsing Yun, and is now a happy volunteer.

Speaking of localization of Buddhism, in Simon’s opinion, it would be more comprehensive to include both English and non-English speaking audiences. She regarded the goal of localization is to attract more people to Humanistic Buddhism, followed by removing the prohibition of different languages or religions. With proper communication and interaction, we can help build their confidence and sense of belonging, and to become volunteers.

Simon thinks the key to localization is the leader. “People make the difference.” A good leader must have a 360-degree view to learn the different needs, and be able to plan the proper talent training. This workshop is a very good investment in talent education.